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Reporting on Medica exhibition Dusseldorf- Andrew Gilmour

The Medica exhibition in Dusseldorf is the largest of its type in the world. Held between the 14 - 18 November in 16 large exhibition halls, every aspect of medicine and physical therapy is represented.

In nearly 35 years of practice I have never seen an exhibition on this scale and wanted to see the latest worldwide developments in the areas of physical therapy, sports medicine and medical imaging.

I was most impressed by the progress being made in the field of rehabilitation, particularly for patients suffering major trauma, strokes and other neurological problems. I guess that computer developments spurred on by the desire to rehabilitate injured forces personnel has helped this.
 
Much of this improved rehab equipment is, by virtue of its cost, more commonly used outside the uk where NHS cost constraints don't limit affordability. I do wonder whether patients suffering severe injury should consider treatment outside the UK

Shock wave treatment for ligament and tendon injuries is being much talked about with the  research underpinning its use growing. The cost of this equipment although still high is no longer prohibitive. Diagnostic ultrasound scanners for musculoskeletal use are becoming more powerful facilitating clearer images from portable devices. I think it won't be long before both types of equipment become affordable for a practice such as ours. 

I returned with many other ideas for better supports and supplies for patients with different problems, to the extent that this exhibition could become a worthwhile annual 'works outing'!!


The Medica exhibition in Dusseldorf is the largest of its type in the world. Held between the 14 - 18 November in 16 large exhibition halls, every aspect of medicine and physical therapy is represented.

In nearly 35 years of practice I have never seen an exhibition on this scale and wanted to see the latest worldwide developments in the areas of physical therapy, sports medicine and medical imaging.

I was most impressed by the progress being made in the field of rehabilitation, particularly for patients suffering major trauma, strokes and other neurological problems. I guess that computer developments spurred on by the desire to rehabilitate injured forces personnel has helped this.
 
Much of this improved rehab equipment is, by virtue of its cost, more commonly used outside the uk where NHS cost constraints don't limit affordability. I do wonder whether patients suffering severe injury should consider treatment elsewhere in Europe or even further afield.

Shock wave treatment for ligament and tendon injuries is being much talked about with the  research underpinning its use growing. The cost of this equipment although still high is no longer prohibitive. Diagnostic ultrasound scanners for musculoskeletal use are becoming more powerful facilitating clearer images from portable devices. I think it won't be long before both types of equipment become affordable for a practice such as ours. 

I returned with many other ideas for better supports and supplies for patients with different problems, to the extent that this exhibition could become a worthwhile annual 'works outing'!!


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